Tag Archives: Microsoft

Get A Second Opinion After Seeing Dr Google

I wasn’t too surprised reading the other day that health-related matters take up 2% of all queries on internet search engines. In fact, I thought the figure would be higher, judging from day-to-day conversations with patients.

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Reading too many Health web-sites may lead to one imagining having various dire diseases, resulting in cyberchondria.

The big question of course is: how reliable are the facts dished out on the Internet? Obviously, its important that these websites are reliable and churn out accurate information. Even so, healthcare information is complicated by a few other factors not related to the reliability of these websites, as explained later.

How do you identify reliable websites? First of all, as a yardstick, websites sponsored by the governments, not-for-profit health or medical organizations, and university medical centers are the most reliable resources on the Internet.  Sites supported by for-profit drug companies, for instance, who may be trying to sell you their products, are usually not your best option. Also note that medical info changes rapidly with time and a look at the dateline of the article is important. Here are a few such sites:

Medlineplus.gov sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and managed by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus provides information on more than 900 diseases and conditions in their “Health Topics” section, and links to other trusted resources.

medlineplus

WebMD  provides a wealth of health information and tools for managing your health from an award-winning website, which is continuously reviewed for accuracy and timeliness.

webMD

MayoClinic.com – owned by the Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, this site is produced by more than 3,300 physicians, scientists and researchers from Mayo Clinic, and provides in-depth, easy-to-understand information on hundreds of diseases and conditions, drugs and supplements, tests and procedures.

mayoclinic

Sometimes,even with reliable trustworthy information, its rather difficult for the untrained public to give due weightage  to the complex info that is being bombarded onto them.  For instance, when reading the side-effects of a particular medication, it is difficult to appreciate that not all the listed side-effects will invariably occur when one consumes the drug.

This is why its better to consult a doctor to obtain clarification. It takes years of medical training to adequately decipher fully what’s found on  web health-sites and to fully appreciate its implications.

In fact, the over-reliance of info on the internet has given rise to a new condition called cyberchondria (aka internet self-diagnosis) – this refers to the practice of leaping to dire conclusions while researching health matters online. If that severe headache haunting you in the morning led you to the Web search-engine and a search on ‘headaches’  led to ‘brain tumours’ or ‘meningitis’,  people tend to look at the first few results in the search-engine which forms the basis for them to probe further till they are convinced  that they have a brain tumour. The likely diagnosis is probably cyberchondria than anything else!   The phenomenon has become so pervasive that Microsoft did its own study on the causes of cyberchondria way back in 2008.

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