Staying Alive – To Stay Alive!

New guidelines have been introduced for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)  which make them more user-friendly. Now everyone can apply!

The new guidelines introduced by the AHA this month essentially place more emphasis on chest compressions being the most important component of the triad (Airway, Breathing, Compression). For untrained bystanders, they need no longer hesitate about giving the ‘kiss of life’; they need only concentrate on the ‘C‘ until the medics arrive. Take a look at how its done:

Again, there’s mention of that Bee Gees hit Staying Alive because the tempo of the song (103 beats per minute) is similar to the speed of the chest compressions that the bystander needs to do on the collapsed person. (I know, try humming this song when chances are you are in a state of stress). In case 70s music is not your cup of tea, try Queen’s “Another One Bites The Dust” although this song has a rather inappropriate title!

Just one word of warning – not all people who collapse on the street have a heart attack. There’s a lot of other causes, ranging from a simple faint to an epileptic fit to a drunk stupor. Then what? I too am waiting for the AHA to issue guidelines on this..

4 responses

  1. Your last comment is relevant. How do you expect the public to be able to differentiate between a guy who collapsed due to a heart attack and those due to other causes? What are the legal implications?

    Doctor2008 replies: Yes, as I’ve said in the blog, this can be quite difficult sometimes. In countries which have ‘Good Samaritan Acts’, some degree of protection though is given to the helper if they offer CPR in good faith.

  2. Hey Doctor, I’m very concerned about how the guidelines for compression only CPR will affect children and infants. Children and infants hold less oxygen in their lungs and need rescue breaths. What about drowning and asthma victims? They’re more likely to be children as well. I teach CPR classes in Tampa, and have blogged about this in depth http://www.tccpr.org/blog.

    Doctor2008says: The AHA recommendations recommend ‘compression only’ for untrained bystanders. Trained people still need to adopt the C,A,B sequence.

  3. […] 5. CPR Change – for as long as many care to remember, CPR meant a combination of chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth breathing, the latter a common reason why bystanders were somewhat reluctant to get involved, In 2010, new guidelines were introduced where the so-called  kiss of  life was abolished. Read my post here. […]

  4. […] 5. CPR Change – for as long as many care to remember, CPR meant a combination of chest compressions and mouth-to-mouth breathing, the latter a common reason why bystanders were somewhat reluctant to get involved, In 2010, new guidelines were introduced where the so-called kiss of life was abolished. Read my post here. […]

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